Monday, November 29, 2004

in the immortal words of george pepard

I love it when a plan comes together:

Wein(ers) and Losers

Deanna's smart media card was miraculously repaired just after soundcheck in the most beautiful hall ever, but the great thing was all the pictures:

the bands of the plunderer:


soundcheck:


Swanny's Red Army of One:


William pretty much seemed at home here (we just missed a John Cage tribute by one day):


Soundcheck number 2:


Tony plays maestro:


Sometimes, a man must do what a man must do:


Our mole in Vienna:

Sunday, November 28, 2004

boas are back in fashion

or at least that's what the kids are telling me these days. highlights of lucern include an extended backlit screen shadow camera session featuring anyone dumb enough to walk in front of the screen. film (of the session) at eleven (local time)

Saturday, November 27, 2004

the funky smart car

almost home again, sort of

these are from brussels,


better yet, candace snapped. really:


some pictures from antwerp

choice:




almost as good as a tiny tim picture:


lest I forget: the funky wildburger:

words may be worth a thousand pictures

but not in belgium and germany for people used to using standard english keyboards. Pictures will be available when I find wireless connectivity.

Sunday, November 21, 2004

check please

Stevanger:

new fjordistan redux

william discovered a new fjord, proving that the vikings weren't all that. below, find pictures of the expedition:


marky was inspired to read kirkegaard's on sickness and death:


the captain:


sam looks sullen but he's just sleeping:

Friday, November 19, 2004

new fjordistan

the sogndal to bergen ferry is really cool, not that sammy could stay awake for it.

Wednesday, November 17, 2004

winters in norway aren't bus friendly

Tuesday, November 16, 2004

maybe i forgot to mention this

Monday, November 15, 2004

proof that the internet is dangerous

here's proof:
sort of gross

un review du den haag

fer real dudes. nice pic too.

trondheim

felix was a backstage cat in trondheim. nice folks, but they sure have their idea of what isn't their responsibility.

Sunday, November 14, 2004

Speaking of whores and culture

Can I just say on the internet something I have been saying for a while amongst friends?

I think Ana Marie Cox is our generation's (yes, I found the apostrophe) Dorothy Parker.

As far as the double entendre I'm leaving it right were it is.

Seriously though, story about being asked to use the word horticulture in a sentance and DP saying "you can lead a horticulture but you can make her think" on the fly is probably one of the best witty retort type of commminications ever in the history of the english language. so there.

mork calling oslo

by the way, we are in Oslo. it is not too cold here actually, but you cannot tell that based on the way oslojans dress. It is as if it were freezing, of course, it is freezing, but I have given up on both the correct time of day anywhere in the world and the number the locals use to refer to the heat or lack thereof. I am also totally open to any suggestions about a truly compelling temperature metric. I think it would almost have to be based on what clothes you need outside or if certain plants will die or bloom or something. Horticulturalists have a thing called degree days, which are the number of degrees above a certain temperature times the number of days. I personally really like this system, which is based on certain chemical reactions that happen inside a plant, but people are not generally smart enough to do that math or aware enough of what might be happening inside their body to notice. plus of course, we are warmblooded. maybe we need a symbiotic creature to hang out with as our clothing coordinators.hmmmm.

even scandanavians are saddened

by the news of ODB passing.

yes, i think his mother said it best

"the kindest, most generous soul on earth."

seriously? no really? I mean, his mom actually said that about him? did she not know?

and while i am asking questions, where is the apostrophe on norwegian keyboards?

Friday, November 12, 2004

pics on the so called internet

the tour bus and tour support vehicle at the staadthalle:

some nice graph at the practice space:

what the bus is like:

no, really.

Wednesday, November 10, 2004

nijmegen, brazil

sure, why not?

this is the last time rick saw his money

in the category of "something I learned today":

if you're going to bet rick on the billiards table, wait until he's really drunk:

willy t turns ten

This is actually better than he looked when he woke up after our first evening...

Tony prefers we actually refer to this as day 2 since we started on the 8th in Nashville even though we only spent a few hours on the plane.

Monday, November 08, 2004

gettin' all nu cle ar

deanna pretty much predicted things were only getting worse starting in Nashville:

Saturday, November 06, 2004

there is still hope

of course, it's only a matter of time before the GOP destroys the funding mechanism for "citizenry mail" or some crap.

I should state a few things up front:
1) I have been using the postal service's (USPS) express service and have found that to most 2nd market cities I can get overnight service for less than 14 bucks guarenteed. for real. try UPS for the same dvd from SF to Nashville - 39 bucks. while FedEx comes in around 18 or so. The only constraint is that you have specific times from specific places that are earlier than fed-ex or UPS. luckily the USPS website will tell you the whens for your wheres.

Postal Service Tale: Indie Rock, Snail Mail and Trademark Law
By BEN SISARIO

Published: November 6, 2004


bout two and a half years ago, Jimmy Tamborello and Ben Gibbard began to make music together despite the distance between them. Mr. Tamborello, who makes electronica with a group called Dntel, lived in Los Angeles, while Mr. Gibbard, who sings in the emo band Death Cab for Cutie, lived in Seattle. They sent each other music through the mail, completing songs bit by bit, and after about five months, they had finished an album.

In honor of their working method they called themselves the Postal Service. Their album, "Give Up," was released by the Seattle-based Sub Pop Records in early 2003 and became an indie-rock hit, eventually selling almost 400,000 copies, the label's second biggest seller ever, after Nirvana's "Bleach."

Then they heard from the real Postal Service, in the form of a cease-and-desist letter.

"It was really polite," said Tony Kiewel, an artist and repertory representative at Sub Pop who works with the band. "It said that the Postal Service is a registered trademark of the United States Postal Service, and that though they were very, very flattered that we were using the name, they need to enforce their copyright."

The letter arrived in August 2003, and for months the label and the band fretted over the consequences: Would the band have to change its name? Would Sub Pop have to destroy its stock of the album?

The outcome was as unusual as the band itself: this week the United States Postal Service - the real one, as in stamps and letters - signed an agreement with Sub Pop granting a free license to use the name in exchange for working to promote using the mail. Future copies of the album and the group's follow-up work will have a notice about the trademark, while the federal Postal Service will sell the band's CD's on its Web site, potentially earning a profit. The band may do some television commercials for the post office.

The group also agreed to perform at the postmaster general's annual National Executive Conference in Washington on Nov. 17. The attendees might not realize what a rare treat they are in for since the Postal Service does not play many gigs. Mr. Tamborello and Mr. Gibbard are busy with their regular bands: Dntel, with its atmospheric electronic dance music, and Death Cab for Cutie, which has become a college rock favorite for its heartfelt, jangly punk rock known as emo.

Gary Thuro, a manager of communications for the United States Postal Service who handles licensing and promotion, said the publicity would be valuable.

"We're always looking for ways to extend our brand and reach into areas we don't typically reach," he said, "like teens and people in their 20's, who are typically doing business online and are not familiar with the Postal Service."

Not familiar with the Postal Service?

"I have three kids, and they do most of their correspondence online," Mr. Thuro said.

He said the post office had been looking to promote its brand through popular culture tie-ins and cited the campaign for the 2003 film "Dr. Seuss' The Cat in the Hat." The post office is ending its sponsorship of Lance Armstrong's cycling team at the end of this year.

The agency's only concern, Mr. Thuro said, was that a rock band might prove an inappropriate mascot for a federal agency. But when executives met with Mr. Tamborello and Mr. Gibbard in Los Angeles earlier this year, they were set at ease. Soft-spoken, well groomed and unusually polite, they are two of the least offensive rock stars imaginable, and their music - bubbly yet pensive electronic pop with earnest vocals by Mr. Gibbard - is unlikely to dissuade anyone from buying stamps.

Mr. Tamborello, 29, said the band was happy to comply with the agreement.

"Doing promos for the post office seems a little bit weird," he said. "But it's a funny story for them to have - it's a good story of how you can still use normal snail mail."

He noted that the regular mail is inexpensive and easy to use, and that packages containing their working discs arrived in a couple of days, a comfortable margin for their unhurried schedule - although when finishing the album, they did use Federal Express a couple of times.

"Just to get it back and forth as quick as possible," he said. "It saved a day."

Thursday, November 04, 2004

just so you know, asshole,

you do not have a mandate from me.

Wednesday, November 03, 2004

remembering reagan

fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck 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fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck 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Tuesday, November 02, 2004

straight from the mouth of ana marie cox

We post these numbers because information wants to be free! Run, information! Run for your life!

lest we forget there's a war going on

The US military is once again killing journalists: (and doing a suprizingly bad job covering up for it - which one thinks may be the whole point)

BAGHDAD (Reuters) - The U.S. military said Tuesday a cameraman killed in the Iraqi city of Ramadi while on assignment for Reuters had died in a gunbattle between Marines and insurgents.

``Marines from the 1st Marine Division of the I Marine Expeditionary Force engaged several insurgents in a brief small arms firefight that killed an individual who was carrying a video camera earlier Monday morning,'' it said in a statement.

It was the military's first response to questions from Reuters about the killing.

Video footage of the incident showed no apparent fighting and no sounds of shooting in the vicinity before Dhia Najim was killed by a single bullet. He filmed heavy clashes between Marines and insurgents earlier in the day but that fighting had subsided.

Najim's colleagues and family said they believed he had been shot by a U.S. sniper.

Reuters Global Managing Editor David Schlesinger said: ``We reject the clear implication in the Marines' statement that Dhia was part of an insurgent group.

``This claim is not supported by the available evidence. I strongly urge the U.S. military to conduct a proper investigation into this tragic event.''

The cameraman was near his house in the Sunni Muslim city's Andalus district when he was hit by a single bullet in the back of the neck that killed him instantly.

Video shot from an upper floor of a building nearby shows Najim, at first half-hidden by a wall, move into the open. As soon as he emerges, a powerful gunshot cracks out and he falls to the ground, his arms outstretched.

Civilians are seen gathering calmly at the scene immediately afterwards to look at his lifeless body.

Marine snipers are posted in Ramadi, news photographs taken Sunday show.

CONCERN AT JOURNALIST DEATHS

State Department spokesman Adam Ereli told reporters in Washington Monday that officials were ``deeply disturbed'' by deaths of journalists in Iraq, including Najim's. ``We rededicate ourselves now to providing an environment in which the free press can do its work,'' he said.

Ereli was commenting on a spate of attacks on journalists in Iraq, including a bomb attack on Al Arabiya television at the weekend which killed seven people. He was speaking before the Marines' statement.

The military statement said: ``Identification badges found on the dead man confirmed employment with a major news agency.

``Inspection of videotape in the camera revealed footage of previous attacks on Multi-National Force military vehicles that included the insurgent use of RPGs (rocket-propelled grenades), an IED (roadside bomb) and small arms fire.''

It was not immediately clear how the U.S. military had been able to view the tape in Najim's camera or check his identity cards. Reuters has asked for the camera to be returned. ``The insurgents fled the scene with their wounded but left the body of the dead man along the side of the road,'' the military statement said.

Najim, who left a wife, three daughters and a son, worked freelance, supplying occasional material to Reuters Television. He was born in 1957.

The last footage received by Reuters from him Monday was shot from behind a red metal container in a dusty street. It shows U.S. Humvee vehicles speeding across an intersection amid flashes from gunfire and explosions.

Marines are gearing up for an expected offensive against insurgents and Islamist militants in Ramadi and Falluja as part of efforts to pacify Iraq before elections in January.

Ramadi, about 70 miles west of Baghdad, lies in mainly Sunni central Iraq where anti-U.S. sentiment runs high.

4 years of work in one day

voting is...

complex.

today I felt like my vote was a sad orgasm.

really. that release, mixed with regret and a sense of inevitability.

pizza party at bolsinga's place to watch the results, that and a day spent watching online results instead of working at full attention.